Posts By :

Nicol Ragland

POETIC JUSTICE : The Art Of Healing 1024 684 Nicol Ragland

POETIC JUSTICE : The Art Of Healing

She was full of despair
Life full of sadness and glum
Her addiction consumed.

​She discovered hope
Every day a new beginning
To find her freedom.

​The future awaits
unchartered territory
anxious heart be still.

​Written by : Courtney Q.

One of many extraordinary women who are participating
in the Poetic Justice program. Poetic Justice’s mission is to offer opportunities for
healing and growth by holding space to process trauma and rewrite personal narratives
to transform the story of incarceration.

My dear sister, Amy Janes and I are in production for an upcoming documentary on their extraordinary
efforts along with the many stories of those behind bars.
Stay tuned as it’s a testament to the power of art and healing even in the most traumatic of circumstances.
So much gratitude to Ellen Stackable + her team as well as inmates who continue to trust us with our cameras. 🙏

LANGSTON UNIVERSITY PARADE 1024 684 Nicol Ragland

LANGSTON UNIVERSITY PARADE

In lock step, a forward gaze, and a discipline that took years.. they marched for blocks.
Head held high with a history as America’s westernmost, historical black college – Langston University

Tailgates from every direction, historical antique cars , roundup clubs , kings and queens and alumni from
50 years ago took pride in the gathering. Together, they amplified that one,
timeless sound that only comes from a local parade.

Nothing but pure joy in documenting such a special event.
In gratitude to Willard Tillman, Sherman Lewis and Sonya Davis to work on assignment
for the Department of Agriculture. Short film to come…

MEG on RAGLAND RANCH 1024 574 Nicol Ragland

MEG on RAGLAND RANCH

Shot the beautiful, Meg Greathouse, on RAGLAND RANCH. Mostly @ 1.4

The Investigation Of Bees 1024 683 Nicol Ragland

The Investigation Of Bees

Mike Favors is a part time private investigator as well as part time bee keeper. After close to 30 years as a special agent for the IRS, tracking down tax evasion and money laundering he decided to retire at the young age of 50. Bee keeping was, of course, the hobby that nourished his inherent quality of curiosity.
‘The engineering of the honeycomb, they say, is the most efficient usage of shape and strength. I wanna know who makes the decisions in these hives.’
The bee lives less than 40 days, visit at least 1000 flowers and produces less than a teaspoon of honey. For us its just a teaspoon of honey, but for the bee its a lifetime.
Bees lie at the heart of our survival and yet every year bees are experiencing massive die-offs throughout the U.S. and Canada. In 2017, the rusty patched bumblebee was the first bee added to the endangered species list in the continental U.S. A 2019 survey from the Bee Informed Partnership states that nearly 40% of U.S. beekeepers lost their colonies during the previous year. Compared to 1947, the U.S. honeybee population has declined by 60%.
Such a gift to find Mike just down the
road from Ragland Ranch. Quite grateful for his efforts
and ongoing investigation to learn how bees can teach
humans of collective intelligence. Much to learn from them.
Find Mike and his honey @ Honey’s Honey OKC
and to learn more on protecting these creatures,
here are TEN ways to do so.
RegenNarration | Podcast 800 800 Nicol Ragland

RegenNarration | Podcast

A conversation I had with Anthony James out of Australia for the podcast ~ RegenNarration.
Thoughts on the litany of issues in the wake of ‘big agriculture’ and its related systems,
going home, empowering rural communities, the building of REGENERATE OKLAHOMA
and the importance of regenerative media …ultimately, changing the story within our food system and collective health.
Big thanks to Anthony.
Such a thoughtful interviewer. ????????
Listen HERE
Urban Vs. Rural 1024 683 Nicol Ragland

Urban Vs. Rural

After meandering the planet and many years on the west coast, I’ve found my
way back to red dirt country close to cowboys, home grown tomatoes and neighbors helping neighbors.

I grew up in front of a big creek where my brother and I would
wait for the downpour of rain in order to crawdad hunt, gather half dollar
turtles and make infirmaries out of shoe boxes for the
ones who didn’t survive the flood.

My grandparents on both sides were rural Oklahoma folk.
We’d visit for a day or a weekend to return with a bucket of strawberries
and dirty fingernails. Somewhere in my DNA, that conditioning
always felt like home. While Los Angeles was a big chapter in my life,
my boots never sank deep enough and my frequency never quite in tune.

Over the last several years, I’ve directed films addressing the health impact due to chemical farming, the growing movement in Regenerative Agriculture and the industrialization of far West Texas. All of which has taken place in rural communities. In so doing, the time frame just so happen to coincide with the acceleration of a divide in our nation that we’ve never seen before. A division often reflected in our civic discourse as rural vs.urban. As I document these boarded up regions enveloped in dust devils and entrails of the industrial medusa, I can’t help to wonder just how we stop these powerful forces building on the economic decline of rural America.

They are places that hold a moral coherence
that should be mandatory in schools. They try not to use Amazon
so they can support local businesses.
They stay clear of self checkout lanes so they can support
local workers and they’re fanatics when it
comes to supporting the local arts.

In addition, these rural communities hold the land stewards
that provide the food, fiber, and energy that cities
cannot create for themselves.

The truth is that urban America needs rural stewards
who harness the productivity of rural America
while maintaining its sustainability. There, in lies, UNITY. A common word used these days in an
effort to mend our divided nation.

What if it’s not about solving but about maintaining a connection?
What if we took a different bridge?
What if we listened to those on the other side of the tracks?
How can we spread the civic mind-set rural folks carry but in abundance?

Robert Frost teaches us to be ‘versed in country things’.
Country things like wide open country, an exhale we couldn’t
find in a concrete jungle, the cacophony of the wild
and a reminder that silence is endangered.

I’ve become real grateful to circle back home to
these red dirt roots of Oklahoma. It just may be central to bridge building.